Snobs and Proles: Waterstones and Wetherspoon’s

8th July 2019 11

The ‘classless society’ espoused by Tony Blair is a meritocratic fallacy. In my local high street two national chains stand facing each other: Waterstone and Wetherspoon. One sells books and the other sells beer, but there is also a stark contrast in clientele. Wetherspoon provides a cheap and cheerful drinking and dining venue for thrifty commoners; Waterstone aims at readers … [Read on]

Is the PC jackboot about to be lifted off the face of English liberty ?

5th July 2019 9

Rejoice, lovers of liberty and Enlightenment values. On the 3rd July 2019, the Court of Appeal decreed that universities should not conflate beliefs with discrimination. Do not underestimate the importance of this judgment, at a time when so many scholars have been persecuted for thought crime. Noah Carl, a talented and conservatively-minded young man, was cast as a Nazi eugenicist … [Read on]

The liberal left has weakened us so much we are forced to take lessons from a dictator who launched a poisoned gas attack on Britain.

2nd July 2019 10

Nationalist strongman Vladimir Putin meets Lionel Barbour editor of the liberal globalist Financial Times. And as the venue is the heavily fortified palace of the Kremlin, Mr Barber is on his best behaviour: no interrupting or haranguing his host for his notorious breaches of the international rules-based order. ‘The liberal idea has become obsolete’ ran the subsequent FT headline, with … [Read on]

Founder of the LSE George Bernard Shaw was a keen eugenicist, but will the left demand his commemorative window to the Fabians be taken down?

10th June 2019 16

The banishing of venerated figures from universities is a relentless exercise in correcting past faults by the standards of the present. Busts or portraits are removed, lecture halls are renamed, and classic works are deleted from the curriculum. University College London has launched an independent enquiry on whether it should continue to honour polymath Sir Francis Galton. The retrospective offence … [Read on]

On comfort blankets

10th December 2018 2

The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas are Setting Up a Generation for Failure, Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukianoff, Allen Lane, 2018, £20. Hysteria is a taboo word nowadays. Derided for its original concept of female volatility wreaked by hormones, it also offends the postmodern elevation of emotional truth. Yet the feminist #MeToo movement, a … [Read on]

What would Enoch have said of modern lies about immigration?

29th June 2018 9

‘Enoch was right’. A remark sometimes made in below-the-line comments on political websites, but never in polite conversation. The phrase, of course, relates to the pariah figure of Enoch Powell and his infamous ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech, half a century ago. The event has been marked in mainstream media as a turning point in race relations, with commentators competing for … [Read on]

The Silence of the Press Lambs

31st May 2018 2

The most significant events in social history tend to arrive unexpectedly, and only in retrospect do we see their inevitability: the storming of the Bastille, the fall of the Berlin Wall. Who would have thought last week that the whole world would be talking about the founder of the English Defence League and the demise of British justice? Tommy Robinson … [Read on]

Dacca by the Thames

9th February 2018 5

A metastasis of apartment blocks, the ubiquitous design differentiated merely by an exterior paint job. Cranes mark where another few degrees of vista will be obscured. Just when it seems every possible gap has been filled, magically another site is cleared and the pile-driving resumes. Parsimoniously-sized flats for the urban dweller, cheaply constructed with a narrow balcony overlooking the railway line. … [Read on]

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