Keeping the Salisbury Review Alive

Since our last appeal you have been enormously generous with your donations which have kept us afloat. Please keep them coming. It costs £4000 to publish a single edition of the Salisbury Review.

In doing so you are keeping alive one of the last independent magazines of the right; we have no owner, no interest group telling us what we can or cannot publish, no censor sitting at the editor’s elbow telling him to take out ‘unwoke’ words; just six willing hands who create the magazine every quarter.

In addition if you are a subscriber to the digital version feel free to send a copy to your friends, you can download it from the web site, for which there is no extra charge, and ask them once they have read it to pass it on, and please, when you have finished reading your paper copy give it to a friend.

Finally, if you are planning your will do give a moment’s thought to a bequest to the Salisbury Review.

The people that walked in darkness will see a great (digital) light..” Apologies to Isiah 9.2 KJV

Thank you for donating. It is much appreciated.

You can use our preferred method via our new Secure Subscriber Site or the PayPal Donate Button below.

Thank You

The Salisbury Review

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10 Comments on Keeping the Salisbury Review Alive

  1. I have bought two books recently from respected publishers, and have found the material quality of the volumes to be inferior to both what one would expect for the price, and to what a decent publisher should allow out under its brand. Both are clearly printed on some species of copier-paper, and while one has a decent binding the other fell apart almost at first glance. The quality of the paper ensures a poor print definition, and the technical illustrations in one book are in several instances useless.

    I think the culprit is print-on-demand. One’s order goes in, and the book is run off by a sub-contractor on something not much better then a photocopier, bound, and sent to you at the price one would pay for a properly printed book.

  2. The Scots, English, Irish and Welsh all refer to their native heritage simply because that is their culture, there has never been any underlying angst.
    Speak to a Texan and he will say ‘I’m from Texas……USA.
    And so on.
    It surely depends on who is asking the question, do you think they will understand or care if I insist on replying, ‘Scotland’ or would it be better to say the U.K. or GB and wait to see if he wants further information.

  3. It was 1938 and they now say a lot of people thought it was a German attack being announced, not paying full attention, and rattled by reports of subs and warships off shore. Not so mad perhaps?
    I hope you’re right about CV. At the moment you have only Bolsonara in your corner and he makes Mr T, for all his manifest qualities, look like a vicar’s daughter (if vicar’s daughters are still like they were when I was a swain).

  4. Myles, I thought your gratitude was satirical. My only knowledge of the CBs comes from novels by William Trevor and he didn’t like them.

    • What did the Protestant William Trevor know about the Christian Brothers?
      They were a fine body of men, now unjustly maligned by atheistic materialists.

  5. Peter. Slavery (like the status of women) is a baffling issue in the ancient world and it is possible that our image of slavery from the US South distorts the old reality. It might have amounted in some cases to something akin to C19th employment in mills and mines. One of Pompeii’s best homes was owned by former slaves and others prospered: what we now have as public-service professionals – medics and teachers – were often slaves. Your quotes are from the OT not the NT which is silent on slavery.

    On the trans business – while one can accept that there might be aberrant psycho-biologies which some will say are best treated as illnesses, others not, the bullying that is taking place is another matter. The Human Rights ideology is weak here: how are the rights of a man-to-woman balanced against the rights of a born-woman in female sports and spaces? We need recourse to notions of justice and charity (in St Paul’s sense 1 Cor 13). The trans ideologues take it for granted that their interests trump all others and no politician dares challenge them. A cynic might say that those men/women who compete in female sports show, by their arrogance, that they are still men all right.

    • How do these people know that they feel like women. I am a woman and I can’t begin to describe how it feels since I have nothing to which I can compare it. Perhaps they are just constipated.

    • Dear Mr. O’Connell.

      It is out of print and I bought a used copy from the Amazon website. It’s a hardback and wasn’t expensive